Shuttleworth Uncovered

2015, Reviews

After a run of sold out events throughout the summer, the team at Old Warden wanted to end the season on a high with a special show that would allow people to get up close and personal with one of the country’s most special museums. The ‘Shuttleworth Uncovered’ show was all about getting people involved with the historical collection and it was a spectacular way to close the season.

Uncovering the Magic

As is normal with shows at Shuttleworth, the air display didn’t start until early in the afternoon but this meant that there was plenty of time to wander around the grounds and get a feel for what the museum is all about.

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Traditionally at Shuttleworth shows, you can pay a small amount extra and get access to the flightline to take close-up shots of the collection’s aircraft. This wasn’t the case at this event though.

The far end of the display line that is usually classified as ‘air side’ was turned into a small showground area where a number of participating aircraft were located. There were no barriers to contend with so you really could get as close to the action as was physically possible with staff encouraging you to participate in a number of activities.

Throughout the morning, museum personnel were giving a variety of talks about the various aircraft on display. The level of interaction between the public and museum staff was fantastic to see and the events team should be congratulated for the way that this was organised.

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Flying High

Shuttleworth is all about historical UK aviation and nothing says ‘British’ quite like the fighters of World War II. After a short flypast from the BBMF Dakota, three fighters formated for a number of flypasts before breaking off into their own solo displays; the based Hawker Sea Hurricane, newly acquired Hawker Hurricane (ex-Peter Vacher) and the recently restored Kennet Aviation Supermarine Seafire.

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The Seafire was particularly nice to see again and although I’d already seen it over the duration of the summer, this felt much closer and like a much more polished routine.

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The season closed at Shuttleworth last year with a spectacular mock air race from a bygone era and the team were keen to remind us of our racing heritage once more in the shape of the de Havilland DH.88 Comet and Percival Mew Gull. Both are famous in the world of air racing and it was an absolute delight to see these two together in the air again. If you’ve never seen it before then you are seriously missing out, the sight and sound of the Comet is just phenomenal!

On paper this perhaps shouldn’t have been one of the highlights of the show but the pairing of the Provost and visiting Harvard was beautiful. The routine was very well choreographed and for the most part, was an exceptionally tight formation. Like many displays at Shuttleworth, the pair made full use of the unique curved display line which made for some pretty special photographic opportunities.

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I’m the first one to admit that the Extra 300, at times, can be a little on the boring side; there are many of them around and when flown in formations aren’t the most exciting of displays. However, Mark Jefferies was booked to fly his Extra 330SC solo routine in front of the Old Warden crowd and quite honestly, it was possibly the best solo Extra routine I’ve seen to date.

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Having seen some fairly sedate (but beautiful) routines throughout the day from the collection’s aircraft, the fast pace of the routine was received with open arms. Flying a lengthy routine of varying maneuvers with smoke and firework-like pyrotechnics on the wing tips, seemed to be exactly what the crowd had been waiting for.

I’ve been documenting this industry for the best part of five years now and I have never seen a reaction from the crowd quite like after this performance. The entire crowd jumped to their feet, cheering, waving and clapping as Mark stepped out of his aircraft. Bravo Sir!

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As well as the above mentioned acts, there were also displays from the rest of the collection’s aircraft, including the incredibly rare and magnificent Edwardian aircraft but almost everyone at Shuttleworth was there for one thing; the final public display of Avro Vulcan XH558.

The show was a complete sellout and throughout the day anticipation and excitement had been building, with many discussing just how much they couldn’t wait to see the tin triangle making full use of the curved crowd line, allowing for that perfect top-side shot.

The Avro Anson had taken off fifteen minutes prior to the Vulcan’s display slot so it was obvious the two were going to formate for a special flypast. The crowd fell silent as the two historic aircraft flew on to the display line and carried out a couple of passes before breaking off.

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The stage was set for what (in principle) could have possibly been one of XH558’s standout displays of it’s second career; golden autumn light, a sellout crowd, a unique display line and an almost cloudless sky. Sadly it wasn’t to be.

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This should have been a really special display, something to remember the aircraft by, a stunning send-off for one of the nation’s most loved aircraft, but it was anything but special. The display felt just like any other display from the last eight years; sedate and completely underwhelming. The crew made absolutely no use of the curved display line and for the most part, it felt like the aircraft was being displayed over another county.

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I really was expecting something memorable from XH558 but it left many feeling disappointed and quite frankly, completely gutted at the missed opportunity.

Keeping the Magic Alive

More, now than ever before, the airshow community is under the microscope and is undergoing possibly the most significant review ever but what is incredibly comforting to see is that people are still massively interested in aviation.

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The Uncovered event was possibly the busiest I have ever seen at Shuttleworth and regardless of the ‘Vulcan Effect’, this is massively important given the current climate.

Once again, the team of dedicated people at Shuttleworth managed to put on an absolute spectacle of a show and while the ‘star’ of the show left a lot to be desired, the rest of the display programme was sublime.

See you next year!

27 Squadron Centenary

Features

27 Squadron was formed back in 1915 as a Squadron within the Royal Flying Corps. During the last 100 years, the Squadron has been at the forefront of the modern battlefield and this week unveiled a special schemed Chinook to celebrate the occasion.

On 5th November 1915, 50 men were taken from No. 24 Squadron Royal Flying Corps and put under the control of Capt G J Malcolm with immediate effect, forming No. 27 Squadron. Since the Squadron’s formation, personnel have been involved in almost every major conflict since and have contributed to all aspects of air power.

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The Squadron was originally equipped with the Martinsyde G.100 ‘Elephant’ (hence the animal’s prominence on the Squadron crest), an aircraft originally intended for use as a fighter but one that actually found itself more suited to reconnaissance and bombing missions in 1916 when the unit moved to France during the Great War. Having participated in some of the biggest battles of the war, the Squadron re-equipped with the Airco DH.4 light bomber in 1917, before returning to the UK in 1920 to be disbanded. After an incredibly short hiatus, 27 Squadron was reformed and assumed air-policing duties over the North-West frontier.

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Less than 20 years later, the Squadron became a Flying Training School operating de Havilland Tiger Moths, Hawker Harts and Wapitis, before re-equipping once more with the Bristol Blenheim bomber. With the Second World War in full flow, 27 Squadron were relocated to Malaya and were tasked with fighting the Japanese advancements but were quickly overpowered and again disbanded in early 1942.

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Having reformed again later in 1942, the Squadron joined 47 Squadron and formed an anti-shipping Strike Wing with rocket-equipped Bristol Beaufighters. For the third time in its history, 27 Squadron were once again disbanded in 1946.

Over the following 40 years, the Squadron was disbanded again on two separate occasions but also underwent some drastic changes. Having flown Douglas Dakotas during the historic Berlin Airlift, the Squadron relocated once more to RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire where the unit flew the English Electric Canberra, and later, the mighty Avro Vulcan. 27 Squadron played a crucial role in the UK’s nuclear anti-deterrent strike force for more than a decade.

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The Squadron moved to RAF Marham in 1983 where they were allocated the brand new Panavia Tornado GR1, before moving to their current home of RAF Odiham and flying the Boeing Chinook.

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The Chinook has been involved in every major conflict since the type entered service and under the guise of 27 Squadron, remained a key part of ISAF operations in Afghanistan right up until the very end when UK forces were finally withdrawn from the country in April this year.

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The Squadron is always ready to deploy at short notice and this was certainly the case earlier this year when they were called upon to aid with the relief effort in Nepal. Although the support was ultimately not required in the end, the deployment proved that the Squadron is always ready to respond to a global crisis.

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For now at least, personnel are finally enjoying a rest from enduring frontline operations; happy centenary 27 Squadron!

Flywheel Festival

2015, Aviation, Reviews

During the Second World War, RAF Bicester was home to many different frontline types including the Spitfire, Halifax, Anson and Blenheim, and was instrumental in the training of operational bomber squadrons. Today though, the ex-MoD site is owned by Bicester Heritage Ltd and remains largely intact with a number of listed buildings still in place. Bicester Heritage bought the facility with the intent of creating the UK’s first ‘business park’ dedicated to preserving historic motoring and aviation, whilst using the existing infrastructure to run their operation. Having formed a small events team in 2014, ‘Flywheel Festival’ was born and the gates to Bicester Heritage were opened for the inaugural show of all things vintage.

It’s very rare these days for new shows to arrive on the UK circuit but Flywheel Festival slotted into the calendar nicely and brought something refreshingly new to the table; a vintage style ‘wings and wheels’ show that gorged on themes from a bygone era.

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Almost the moment that you stepped foot inside the venue, you could tell that this event was going to be something special; the smell of oil and fuel was incredible! The day promised both on-track action and displays in the air, and I have to be honest that even with the horrendous weather on the Saturday (sadly the only day I could make it), the show was incredibly enjoyable.

Start Your Engines!

I have been following the story of Bicester Heritage for a number of months now and it has been somewhere that I’ve been wanting to visit for a while. There is something so incredibly enticing about the world of historical motoring so I was really looking forward to getting up close and personal with some of the most influential cars from the past 70 years.

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The paddock was located just behind the old Air Traffic Control tower and was designed almost perfectly for the visiting public. The cars were lined up and parked (mostly) in their running order to make the process of getting to the track as fluid as possible. There were no big metal barriers preventing you from getting up close to the vehicles, just a small line of rope that spent most of the day on the floor.

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I found that the owners were more than happy to openly discuss the highs and lows of owning such temperamental historic motors, and most were actually keen to get you as close to the cars as you wanted to be. The atmosphere in the paddock area was fantastic and there was a real buzz about the place; it seemed that everyone was completely aware of their surroundings and knew exactly when they needed to get out of the way without even being asked to move.

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With my pass collected and the sound of engines starting up, it was time to head around to the far side of the track and start capturing the action.

The circuit was a simple figure of eight controlled by a team of marshals and was lined with hay bales in case anything took a turn for the worse. The persistent rain pretty much all day meant that the ground was wet and slippery but it didn’t seem to stop some drivers from pushing the limits of their ability! It took some time to work out where to get the best shots but the beauty of it was that it was so easy to move about the outside of the track.

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Austin 7 Ulster Special, 1930

The track acted as the arena of the complex and was surrounded by vintage vehicles that were dotted all over the showground. This included a number of WWII tanks, a Dakota that was flown in on the Friday as well as plenty of other vintage cars and trucks.

The on-track driving started shortly after the gates opened and ran for most of the day. Each driver would have at least two runs before the session ended and the idea was that when the track sessions were complete and the drivers were prepping for the next round, something would take to the skies to entertain the crowds. Due to the weather this didn’t exactly go as planned but we’ll get to that later.

Being so close to the action offered something that many ‘wings and wheels’ style events don’t because the motoring aspect normally only occurs on the runway but with the all-grass runway at Bicester, that wasn’t an option.

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Sprite Sebring, 1960

As I said earlier, the on-track driving was split up into a number of sessions that ran throughout the day so you could quite easily experiment with your locations and photography techniques; if you missed the shot that you wanted the first time around, you were pretty much guaranteed that you’d get another chance to get it right! In the constant drizzle this proved almost invaluable.

The driving was incredibly entertaining and was narrated fantastically by a very knowledgeable team. For motoring novices like myself, this was a much needed part of the day and I think without it, the event would have been very different (and not necessarily in a good way).

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Allard J2, 1950

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Lotus Mk X, 1955

Towards mid-afternoon I have to admit that I was starting to lose interest in seeing the same cars go around again but I think that’s because I was photographing them for most of the day up until that point. I felt that the motoring side of the event could have been improved slightly by changing the track layout midday, it would have been fairly simple to reconfigure the figure of eight into an oval and by doing so, would have allowed the drivers to get up a little more speed on the straights to demonstrate the true power of their engines.

Preparing For Take-Off

The persistent rain, low cloud base and exceptionally poor visibility had a massive effect on the air displays that took place on the Saturday.

The display programme was delayed by approximately 90 minutes but the afternoon’s flying finally got going when the beautiful Dragon Rapide started its engine and gracefully took to the sky. It may have been raining still (quite heavily actually) but what followed was ten minutes of exceptionally majestic display flying by David Finnegan. This was the first time that I had seen this particular Rapide in the sky but the shape and sound of the aircraft never ceases to impress. This was possibly some of the most challenging weather I’ve shot in recently but I just about came away with some usable images.

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As the weather continued to deteriorate, the Great War Display Team were forced to delay their display by almost an hour but it was well worth the wait. I’ve seen these guys perform a number of times over recent years and have found their routine a little confusing if you can’t quite hear the commentary that goes with the display. However, at Flywheel the commentary was more than audible which meant that the display flowed incredibly well and for the first time (that I’ve ever seen anyway) small pyrotechnics were used on the ground to add another dimension to the display. The team put on a brilliant demonstration of WWI dogfighting tactics and should be applauded.

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As the Tiger Nine started to prepare for their flight, the heavens opened and most were forced to take cover under one thing or another. Fortunately I was stood near the corporate hospitality tent at the time and the staff were more than happy for us to take shelter and wait the rain out. A massive thank you to all involved for allowing this to happen.

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The clouds finally started to break and allowed the nine de Havilland Tiger Moths to form up on the runway, ready for the start of their display. I’ve read a lot about this team and heard many interesting tales about them but amazingly, in the five years I’ve been interested in this hobby, I’d never actually seen them display before.

The display itself consisted of a number of formation fly-bys before breaking crowd centre and finishing the routine with a mass flypast. It sounds simple and it was, but at the same time it was a faultless demonstration of just why this particular aircraft was such a popular choice when training the RAF fighter pilots of the 1940s. The raw talent of the pilots was clear to see with such precise and graceful formation manoeuvres. This display was a superb fit for the historic surroundings.

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It was by this time that unfortunately, due to the weather, both the Spitfire and Blenheim were forced to call it a day. The storms that had recently passed over the Oxfordshire countryside had now reached further east and had got quite a lot worse. This meant that a safety call was made and that both aircraft remained on the ground at their respective airfields.

It would seem that the organisers were incredibly eager to get both these aircraft on the ground early on Sunday and true to their word, that’s exactly what happened. As the Blenheim touched down at its former base, the crowd erupted into spontaneous applause; by all accounts it was a pretty emotional moment for many of the older generation that were present. The Blenheim was followed closely by the photo-reconnaissance Spitfire of Peter Teichman and both went on to perform spectacular displays later that day.

© Chris Byrne, Flywheel Festival 2015

Back to Saturday though and it was over to the single Yak-50 of the Yakovlevs Display Team to close the show. The blanket of grey made way for some rare clear blue sky and with that, the purpose-built aerobatic aircraft quickly gained altitude to begins its full display. The Yak-50 is renowned for its aerobatic ability and is a previous winner of the World Aerobatic Championships, on two separate occasions.

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I have seen this particular display many times and it never ceases to impress. The Yak-50 is an incredible piece of Russian engineering and has an unmistakable sound that goes hand in hand with its epic aerobatic capability. The solo display was a fitting finale for the Flywheel Festival’s first day and meant that the show ended on a high note.

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As for the Sunday finale, well it was supposed to be ‘nation’s favourite aircraft’; the mighty Avro Vulcan. XH558 is sadly now in her final display season and the Flywheel Festival organisers had worked exceptionally hard to secure the flypast to sign-off their inaugural show but it wasn’t to be. Due to an unforeseen incident on the runway at Doncaster airport, the Vulcan was forced to sit running idle for longer than anticipated and this led to the aircraft being lower on fuel than had been planned for.

Unfortunately no-one at Bicester was informed of this and as a result the large crowd that had turned out to see the majestic lady, were forced to wait for something that was never going to happen. The organisers tried to contact personnel of VTTS on multiple occasions but there was no answer and no explanation of what was going on until it was too late. The news that the Bicester flypast had been scrubbed only reached the team at 1715 when they eventually managed to get hold of the PR representative. VTTS had been tweeting for the duration of their flight and regardless of whether they were in the air or on the ground somewhere, it would have been incredibly easy for them to let Flywheel know. In a time where you can say so much with just 140 characters, it seems almost unacceptable that people were left uninformed and disappointed until the very last minute. Such a shame as this could have been a superb ending to the weekend.

Due to the cancellations, the air display was left feeling a little thin but I love what they’re trying to be achieve at Bicester. If Flywheel is to continue (and I believe it will), the air display needs to feature just as heavily as the motoring and more iconic aircraft from the period should be included. It would be fantastic if the budget could stretch to a couple of vintage jets too; obviously they wouldn’t be able to operate from the airfield itself but they would fit in perfectly. At the end of the day this will all come down to budget.

So Much Promise

As the dust begins to settle, the team at Flywheel Festival can look back on their first show and be incredibly proud of what they’ve managed to achieve.

Even with the horrific weather on the Saturday, some 6000+ people attended the show over the two days. At £25 for an adult ticket (that also included a free in-depth souvenir programme worth £5) the event was good value for money, especially if you’re interested in both elements of the show.

The food and drink on offer was of a quality that many air show goers are not particularly used to; freshly made pizzas prepared and cooked while you wait, and freshly made burgers that were cooked to order. The food at each outlet was fairly priced with the most expensive pizza costing just £7 – I don’t know about everyone else but I am much happier paying that sort of money for quality rather than just a couple of pounds less for an average greasy burger.

With a little tweaking here and there, this event has the potential to be one of the highlights on the UK circuit. Bicester Heritage oozes class and prestige, and on that alone promises an awful lot of excitement for the future.

I truly believe that the 2016 show will be an absolute must!

Review – Shuttleworth Season Finale ‘Race Day’ Airshow

2014, Aviation, Reviews

The Shuttleworth ‘Race Day’ airshow was the finale to Old Warden’s long season and for many enthusiasts, the last airshow of the year. The weather forecast had been getting marginally better for a number of days and on Saturday night I took a gamble and booked my ticket.

You couldn’t have asked for more really; a crisp autumn day and plenty of displays to watch in the skies above rural Bedfordshire. I attended the Military Pageant airshow earlier in the year and it was more than enough to tempt me back again for the end of season display.

Race Day

The idea behind the ‘Race Day’ season finale airshow was to celebrate the golden years of ‘air racing’, most notably because this October marks 80 years since the 1934 MacRobertson Air Race in which the Collection’s de Havilland DH.88 Comet claimed first place.

To mark this anniversary, the Collection organised a special flypast of six aircraft that participated in the ‘World’s Greatest Air Race’; a de Havilland DH.88 Comet (Grosvenor House – the only specific airframe to fly in the race), a Dragon Rapide, a Miles M3A Falcon Major, a Miles Hawk, a Desoutter Mk1 and a de Havilland DH.80A Puss Moth. All six aircraft flew past in a very loose formation (sadly too loose for me to capture in one frame) and then carried out several solo fly pasts before landing in the order that they arrived in Melbourne in 1934. It was a lovely way to celebrate such a momentous occasion.

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The Air Race theme continued with another special formation flypast of three aircraft; two Percival Mew Gulls and a Vans RV-7. In 1939 Alex Henshaw flew Mew Gull G-AEXF and completed the 12,754-mile round trip in a staggering 4 days, 10 hours and sixteen minutes – some 71 years later, Steve Noujaim beat Henshaw’s record by 23 hours in a Vans RV-7. These trips to South Africa are regarded by many as two of the greatest and most intriguing stories in the aviation world and rightly so. The speed, sound and agility of the 1930s Mew Gull has to be seen to be believed, it’s a truly remarkable piece of British engineering.

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The show also celebrated the Formula 1 air racing class of aircraft with a Cosmic Wind and a Taylor JT.2 Titch. These two aircraft are exceptionally small but can travel at incredible speeds – the Cosmic Wind was first built in 1947 and can achieve an impressive airspeed of 185mph! The Formula 1 racers flew several laps of the airfield before landing safely back on the grass runway.

Capture

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The Air Race celebrations ended with a fantastic mock air race. The race used a handicap system which meant that the ten participating aircraft (two Chilton DW1s, a de Havilland DH60X Moth, Miles Hawk Speed Six, Miles M3A Falcon Major, Miles Whitney Straight, Comper Swift, Miles Magister and a Spartan Executive) took off in order of slowest-fastest with time advantages between each aircraft. Each aircraft had to complete eight laps of the triangular course which stretched to the airfield boundaries in each direction – the winner was the first to cross the finish line having successfully completed all eight laps. For twenty minutes the audience was transported back in time and it was incredibly easy to forget that you were still in 2014. The sound, sight and atmosphere was electric – the organisers did a terrific job of demonstrating what air racing was all about in a bygone era. An epic way to finish off the Race Day spectacle.

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Best of The Rest

The rest of the airshow was padded out with some truly fantastic displays.

The Hawker Hunter T7 from North Weald Airfield arrived in style low and fast and let off just the tiniest hint of a blue note. Chris Heames flew a beautiful display in what has to be one of my all time favourite aircraft and filled the sky with the roar of the timeless Avon engine.

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Hawker aircraft continued to thrill the crowd, this time in the form of the Collection’s own Sea Hurricane. I’ve seen a lot of Hurricane displays over the years but this was, hands down, the most thrilling and exhilarating routine I’ve ever seen. It felt closer than ever thanks to the sweeping curve of the Shuttleworth display line and it seemed to just go on forever – it was like an enthusiasts dream display.

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Joining the Sea Hurricane in the golden autumnal light was the Westland Lysander. The Lysander is a peculiar looking aircraft with it’s bulky fuselage and high cockpit but’s it’s an incredibly graceful and majestic aircraft. This was the first time that I’ve had the opportunity to see the Lysander in all it’s glory and it really is quite a special aircraft.

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The Shuttleworth collection is home to a fantastic array of aircraft but perhaps one of the most unusual looking airframes is the Fauval Glider. The glider was taken up on a tow and released at altitude; what followed was a brilliantly flown aerobatic sequence. With it’s short fuselage, large wingspan and small twin tail, the aircraft is capable of flipping on it’s tail in no time at all. The crowd was all but silent and all you could hear was the wind passing over the aircraft as the glider came into land. It was a glider display unlike any I’ve seen before.

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A Fitting Tribute

Overall the ‘Race Day’ finale was a show of epic proportions – a packed flying display and almost perfect weather conditions made this one of the best airshows of the year for me. I attended the Red Bull Air Race at Ascot earlier this year so was more than intrigued when I heard that Shuttleworth were planning to celebrate the golden age of air racing. There were plenty of aircraft types that I’d never been fortunate enough to see before and the mock air race finale really was enough to make your jaw drop.

It may only have been my second show at Old Warden but I feel that I’ll be attending many more shows in the coming years. There’s something quite unique about this small all-grass airfield and there’s no doubt in my mind that The Shuttleworth Collection will make you fall in love with aviation all over again.

Review – Dunsfold Wings & Wheels

2014, Reviews, Uncategorized

For the past ten years, the August bank holiday weekend has been home to the Dunsfold based Wings & Wheels show – an all-day event dedicated to showcasing both motoring and aviation displays.

The Wings & Wheels show is celebrating it’s tenth anniversary this year and Dunsfold Park were extremely keen to show that they’re still one of the best shows on the UK circuit. With two massive crowd-pulling aircraft confirmed for the show, the ‘double V effect’ led to an almost capacity show on Saturday and a completely sold out show on the Sunday.

The Wings

The team at Dunsfold Park pride themselves on being able to stage a fantastic air display year in, year out and 2014 was no different. With a backdrop of greenery at both ends of the airfield and a relatively short crowd line, the venue has become synonymous with both warbird and vintage jet displays.

After being absent from the show in 2013, the Old Flying Machine Company Spitfire and P-51 Mustang made an incredibly welcome return in the form of MH434 and Ferocious Frankie. If you’ve only ever seen WWII aircraft flown in the hands of the RAF’s BBMF then you might be in for a bit of a shock. With plenty of low, extremely tight formation flypasts and two superb solo performances, the OFMC duo certainly rank extremely highly on the list of this country’s best warbird displays (if not the best). The noise of these two aircraft in close formation is just phenomenal and it really is a display that’s ideal for photographers. I’m not sure I’ll ever tire of seeing these two machines.

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2014 is an epic year for any aviation fan – for the first time in more than 50 years, two flying Lancasters are in the UK at the same time. The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight at RAF Coningsby are currently hosting the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum’s Avro Lancaster ‘VeRA’ and for a handful of shows in the country, both aircraft are displaying together with fighter escorts. Wings & Wheels was one of those events that drew a lucky straw and my goodness did it show. Having attended the show for the past six years, I’ve become quite used to the relaxed and laid back atmosphere at Dunsfold but this year was the busiest I’ve ever seen it – if you weren’t on the crowd line by 9.15am then you’d missed your chance for a front row seat. The routine was mainly just the normal BBMF trio routine with an additional Lancaster – don’t get me wrong, it’s incredible what the team have achieved in getting the aircraft over here but I’m just so gutted that we didn’t get to see ‘VeRA’ in all her glory in a solo routine. Saying that though, the sight and sound of all those Merlin engines was simply spectacular and a really special tribute to all those that were lost in WWII.

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Making it’s second appearance at the show in as many years was the Royal Netherlands Air Force Historic Flight B-25 Mitchell. After a problematic weekend last year, the team behind ‘Sabrina’ demonstrated that you really don’t have to just fly wide circuits with historic aircraft and put on a truly breath taking display of strength and agility. Looking at the American-made bomber, you’d never believe that the aircraft was capable of flying in the way that the team did – it makes you wonder what a slightly heavier bomber would be capable of if there were no limitations…

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The Dunsfold Park team have become renowned for putting together unique flypasts and this year there were two such displays. The first consisted of the B-25 Mitchell, the Dunsfold based DC-3 and the OFMC fighter pair and much like the BBMF routine, it was a fitting tribute to all those that took part in the Second World War. The second formation routine saw Avro Vulcan XH558 take to the skies with the three-ship Gnat display team and although it was a nice thing to see, I actually thought that it was a rather lack-lustre formation. I think I would have preferred to see the three Gnats leading at the front of the formation in a short arrow, rather than at each tip of the Vulcan’s vast triangular fuselage. Putting that personal dissatisfaction aside, the organisers have to be applauded for continually thinking outside of the box and supplying elements that can only be seen at Dunsfold.

The Midair Squadron continued the classic jet theme with their Canberra PR.9 and Hunter T.7. Over the past twelve months, the Kemble based display team have well and truly stamped their mark on the UK airshow scene. The display started out with a beautifully elegant pairs routine which showed off the pilots’ skill in maintaining a constant close formation throughout the opening section. After a crowd centre break, the Hunter and Canberra split into two solo performances. Both aircraft were flown with extreme enthusiasm, especially on the Canberra’s finale which brought back that almighty high speed pass from earlier in the year at Abingdon – boy can that aircraft howl! It’s easy to see why the team have had so many bookings this year, I’ve got everything crossed for the Midair Squadron to be around for many years to come.

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The display programme was bolstered by both Army Air Corps and RAF assets. Continuing on a rollercoaster of epic proportions, the Odiham based Chinook Display Team took to the skies over Dunsfold and delivered yet another awe-inspiring display of power and agility – the type carries out a lot of routine training at Dunsfold so it means an awful lot to Odiham to be able to say thank you in their own special way.

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The show was closed by the AAC Apache and for 2014, the Wattisham team have opted for a role demonstration. The scenario follows a typical mission in Afghanistan – whilst out on a routine patrol, the Apache is called in to provide close air support for a coalition unit who are heavily under fire on the ground. A show of force (a low and fast pass without any use of weapons) prompts the enemy to launch a surface-to-air missile (SAM) which narrowly misses the gunship. After repositioning, the aircraft is authorised to fire a Hellfire missile on the enemy position and to use it’s 30mm cannon to completely neutralise the enemy. It’s thought that the enemy are all but gone when the Apache takes enemy fire from small arms but they’re quickly dealt with when the mosquito (the name the Taliban have given to the mighty helicopter) unleashes a salvo of CRV7 rockets. The Apache’s weapons systems are simulated by specially designed pyrotechnics which range from a series of single bursts of smoke for the strafing run to full blown balls of fire that represent rocket and Hellfire attacks. The whole routine is very reminiscent of the old Tornado Role Demo and it’s an absolute pleasure to watch – personally I prefer these types of display to the more normal aerobatic performances. To see just a fraction of what an aircraft is capable of in a combat environment is incredibly impressive and it gives a fantastic insight into the role that they play outside of the airshow bubble. I really hope that the role demo returns in 2015 – it would be great to see the Apache joined by an AAC Wildcat and maybe even some Army ground elements. I strongly believe that role demonstrations captivate the audience much more and it can only be a good thing for recruitment.

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The Wheels

The motoring element, like the air display, is broken up into two separate segments; one in the morning and one in the middle of the afternoon. The cars and motorbikes are provided by Brooklands Museum as well as many private owners/collectors. Once again Dunsfold slightly improved the motoring section by having several different groups of vehicles run right along the crowd line so that people could get a little closer while the main driving was still happening on track.

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As much as I love watching the motor displays, I don’t quite understand why it’s repeated later in the day. At the moment it’s broken into two one-hour slots which are exactly the same – for the first run the audience seems to be fully immersed in the sights and sounds that cars and bikes have to offer but later on in the day, it seems like it’s used by most to go and get some food or to look around the stalls. I feel that the show could really benefit from breaking up the motoring section into two completely different sections, even if that it means that each section is only 30-40 minutes long. I’m confident that in doing so, the team would be able to keep all eyes on the track at all times of the day, rather than just doing a complete re-run from a couple of hours previous.

The Rest of The Show

Also new for the 2014 show was a small remote controlled aircraft section. After the very successful Dunsfold debut of the ‘Reds Duo’ last year, a larger contingent was put together for this year and I have to be honest, it was a very welcome addition. The skill that these people have in controlling an aircraft from the ground is incredible and one of them was just ten years old! I’m 24 years old and all I can do with my R/C Spitfire is fly it into the ground.

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As usual there was a nice mixture of aviation related stalls which is a danger to any enthusiast who carries a purse or wallet – amazingly I managed to resist buying anything although I did very nearly buy a nice print off Aces High.

The Brooklands owned Vickers VC-10 that retired to the airfield late last year was supposed to conduct it’s first public taxi runs this year but unfortunately the aircraft has deteriorated more than was expected and as a result it will not be ready for running until the 2015 show.

For all that Wings & Wheels is an airshow, the number of aircraft on the ground for the public to see and get close to is fairly limited. Yes you can pay to go on both the VC-10 and 747 but it could be so much more. The amount of space available on the taxiway at the end of the airfield (next to the two large aircraft) where some displaying aircraft park, is not used nearly enough and it would be great if this could be opened up early in the morning for a limited number (possibly first-come first-served) of people to get close for photographs. I honestly feel that Wings & Wheels still has room to grow without becoming too big for its boots – even something like a small night shoot could easily be arranged on the Friday or Saturday night without too much hassle or extra costs.

I went on the Saturday but heard that exiting the site on Sunday was a bit of a nightmare with some cars only moving a few metres in half an hour. If the show continues to attract unique and special aircraft, it may soon be time to start thinking about advance ticket sales only.

Overall the 2014 show was a massive success; a close to capacity crowd on Saturday, a total sell out on Sunday and plenty of star items all combine to make Wings & Wheels one of the best airshows of the year.

Happy 10th birthday Wings & Wheels – I cannot wait to see what the next decade holds for the Surrey show.

Feature – RIAT 2014 Thursday Arrivals

Aviation, Features

The Royal International Air Tattoo is well and truly underway at RAF Fairford. Below are some photographs from the arrivals on Thursday 10th July.

Review – Shuttleworth Military Pageant

2014, Aviation, Reviews

Set in the beautiful Bedfordshire countryside, Old Warden airfield is home to the world famous Shuttleworth Collection and on June 29th, hosted the 2014 Military Pageant Airshow.

Old Warden is home to the unique and renowned Shuttleworth collection – a museum full of working airframes, many of which are the sole remaining aircraft of their type. Driving on to the airfield, you’re instantly transported back to 100 years ago – the airfield and it’s surroundings are truly stunning and make the perfect setting for an airshow full of vintage aircraft.

The weather forecast was predictably unpredictable with rain forecast on and off for most of the day. This meant that there weren’t too many people fighting for the front row early on so I decided to have a look at the participating aircraft while they lined up on the grass. Unfortunately they were nearly all facing away from the crowd line but it’s almost impossible to catch most of these aircraft in an ugly light. The stretched canvas and simplistic shapes make for some fantastic photographic opportunities.

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Having spent a couple of hours looking around the collection and the stalls that were set up, the air displays finally got underway about 2pm. The show got off to a beautiful start with the based Hawker Sea Hurricane and the newly restored Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Ia from the Aircraft Restoration Company, based at IWM Duxford. Beginning with a pairs display, the two Merlin-powered WWII fighters graced the Bedfordshire skies with some truly timeless aerobatics. It was a fantastic way to open the afternoon’s event.

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After another very graceful display by the based Gloster Gladiator, the second visitor of the day came in very low over the opposite end of the airfield. With a bright white paint scheme and super sleek lines, it was the Duxford based PBY Catalina’s turn to impress the crowd…and boy did they impress. I’ve seen the membership-sponsored Catalina display countless times but never like it was flown on that Sunday. Seeing the Catalina being thrown around the thunderous sky was like watching a modern day fighter/bomber; the display was low, powerful and flown with 110% commitment. By 2.30pm, I’d already witnessed the display of the day – just stunning.

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Following the Catalina was a brilliant display by a trio of monoplane trainer aircraft; a Miles Magister, DHC 1 Chipmunk and a Percival Provost T1. Like the pairs display earlier in the day, the trio flew several tight formations before splitting off into their own solo displays. All three were flown superbly but for me the highlight was the Magister- the two seat basic trainer was first flown in 1937 and with the gorgeous backdrop of Old Warden, it didn’t look at all out of place. Elegance personified.

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From monoplane to triplane – a late production Sopwith Triplane to be exact, nicknamed ‘Dixie’. The start of the triplane’s display was lovely with lots of sweeping passes showing off the unique structure of the aircraft. However, what followed was very much unexpected. Halfway through the display, the engine sounded like it cut out for a few seconds but fortunately the pilot managed to get things going again. Towards the end of the routine, the engine sounded like it cut out completely – I didn’t realise what was going on at first but it soon became clear that the pilot was trying to make an emergency landing.

What happened next took everyone by surprise – the aircraft came in extremely low over the back of the airfield, so low in fact that the aircraft got caught on a fence and as a result, went nose over. The crowd fell silent and within 30 seconds the crash site was secured by the show’s emergency responders. I’m happy to say that the pilot was in fact completely fine and didn’t suffer so much as a bruise. That was the first crash I’d been witness to the whole things was fairly surreal.

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Making sure the pilot was ok was clearly Shuttleworth’s primary focus and rightly so. After just under an hour later, the airfield was clear and ready to kickstart the air displays again. Full marks have to be awarded to Shuttleworth here – the flying schedule was rearranged and extended so that all the booked items could still display.

The afternoon got back into the swing of things with a display from the collection’s Hawker Hind and Hawker Demon. To the untrained eye, the Hind and the Demon look incredibly similar and at times even I struggled to tell them apart – the pair performed a wonderfully synchronised routine with plenty of noise and low passes. The Hawker pair put on an aerial ballet that was an absolute pleasure to watch and I found myself watching this display more than photographing it.

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As the Hawker pair landed, a trio of biplanes prepared to get airborne; a Blackburn B2, DH82a Tiger Moth and a Polikarpov Po2. The aircraft were flown beautifully but unfortunately the Po2 was the last of the three to come in for it’s solo routine and as a result, suffered possibly the worst weather of the entire day. The rain was absolutely pelting down but with visibility still pretty good, the pilot decided it was safe to stay up and finish his display. The Soviet built trainer (and cropduster) was an aircraft that I’d not seen before so I was slightly gutted that the sun couldn’t come out for it’s display.

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The rain continued and the cloud began to get lower and lower but amazingly it didn’t stop Hawker Hunter T7 WV372 from putting on a spectacular display. This particular Hunter was a member of the short lived Team Viper Display Team and having been purchased by a new owner, now resides at North Weald airfield. Many thought that given the conditions, the Hunter would be unable to join the show so late in the afternoon but the low cloud didn’t seem to bother the pilot. With a beautiful long ‘blue note’ on arrival, the T7 certainly showed off it’s agile handling capabilities and seeing a jet aircraft after so many props was a very welcome treat. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the older aircraft but you just can’t beat the sound and shape of a Hunter.

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Sadly the Hunter was the last display of the day for me, I was soaked through and had a 90-minute drive home. Given that the rain didn’t look as though it was going to clear any time soon, I made the decision to call it a day. Old Warden offered up a truly fantastic spectacle of an airshow and to begin with, I wasn’t sure that I’d enjoy the classic side of aviation – how wrong could I be. Vintage aircraft set it beautiful surroundings made for a brilliant day. As well as the display, the organisers also made sure that all stalls present on the day were 100% related to aviation; whether it be books, prints or models, there was something for everyone to enjoy. Unfortunately it meant that I had to part with some additional money but hey, my display cabinet looks all the better for it!

The Military Pageant was an incredible show and it certainly won’t be the last time I visit the Bedfordshire airfield.

You can keep up-to-date with the Shuttleworth Collection via their website http://www.shuttleworth.org/index.asp, Twitter @Shuttleworth_OW and on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ShuttleworthCollection.