Bruntingthorpe Cold War Jets Day

2015, Aviation, Reviews

Bruntingthorpe Aerodrome has become synonymous with the golden age of British aviation and is home to a collection that makes any enthusiast feel like they’ve time travelled to a bygone era. The airfield opens its gates to the public twice a year for the Cold War Jets Day event; a whole day filled with the thundering sound of old-school jet engines. Bruntingthorpe has been on my to-do list for a number of years now and I thought it was about time to make the 250 mile round-trip to check out what all the fuss is about.

Based just outside of Lutterworth in Leicestershire, the Aerodrome is the former site of RAF Bruntingthorpe and was originally constructed as a heavy bomber base during the Second World War. After the War the airfield was taken over by Powerjets Ltd.; Frank Whittle’s highly experimental jet aircraft testing company, and was later used as the base for Avro Vulcan XH558’s overhaul and return to flight in 2008.

Today, Bruntingthorpe Aerodrome is home to one of the greatest (if not the best) collections of Cold War-era aircraft anywhere in the world and the talented team of volunteers pride themselves on the large number of airframes that are kept in a ground running capacity.

After just over two and a half hours of driving, I pulled up and entered an exceptionally nostalgic world of jet-powered aviation.

WARNING! You May Lose Your Hearing…

The day’s running didn’t start until around 1130am so this gave plenty of time to have a look around the ‘museum’ section of the airfield. Between the ex-RAF Tristars and VC-10s are a number of aircraft that have been collected by the site over recent years.

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The aircraft are all looking a little worse for wear but I guess that’s what you’d expect from a collection that’s housed outside in all that Mother Nature has to offer. Reminiscent of the Gatwick Aviation Museum, Bruntingthorpe offers aircraft a place to retire and live out the rest of their lives being adored by those that have fond memories of the British aviation industry. The aircraft – with their peeling and cracked paintwork – make excellent subjects for close-up photography and I have to admit I was completely in my element and spent the best part of two hours crouching in all sorts of weird positions to get the shots I wanted.

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It was soon time to grab my place on the relatively short (and restrictive) crowd line and the first aircraft of the day to fire up it’s engines was the last-serving ex-RAF Nimrod MR2. The aircraft was officially handed over on April 29th 2010 and has been kept in ground-running condition ever since. I vaguely remember seeing the Nimrod at airshows but I’d never seen it as up-close as this! With the rain continuing to saturate the runway, XV226 pirouetted in front of the crowd before blasting straight down the runway.

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Bruntingthorpe is home to four Blackburn Buccaneers that are looked after by The Buccaneer Aviation Group and two of these were in serviceable condition for running. XW554 was first to take to the damp runway.

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As the crew began to pour on the coals, I put my ear defenders on and got goosebumps as the glorious Buccaneer roared ferociously down the tarmac. I’ve only ever seen these aircraft in museums before, so to see something like this right in front of me really was quite incredible.

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The fantastic thing, as I’ve already mentioned, is that this was just the first of two Buccaneers to run. The second came much later in the afternoon and unlike the first one, looked completely beaten up; just how an aircraft should look when it’s retired from active service. The runway had dried up by the time XX900 (owned by David Walton) took to the stage but even without the spray, the Buccaneer is a truly incredible aircraft and created one of the most spine-tingling moments of the day!

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After a flurry of Jet Provosts, the peculiar looking ex-RAE (Royal Aircraft Establishment) Canberra WT333 – affectionately known as ‘Trebble Three’. WT333 didn’t enter service with the RAF and instead served purely as a flying testbed with the likes of the RAE at Farnborough and Boscombe Down.

The Canberra fired up in a plume of thick black smoke and with engines running, the bulbous airframe stumbled down the runway and greeted the crowd with a slow head-on turn before returning to her starting position. With the throttle on, WT333 started rolling down the tarmac at speed and lifted its nose into the air; you could almost feel how much she wanted to get off the ground!

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I quickly realised that my 70-300mm lens was going to be a bit of a tight fit for some of the aircraft even at the 70mm end and I paid the price with the Victor – it was just too big to get in the frame.

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Designed and built by the Handley Page Aircraft Company, the Victor was the last of the three V-Bombers to enter service with the Royal Air Force in 1958 and the last to be retired in 1993 (albeit in a different role by that point).

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As XM715 blasted down the runway, the rumble of the four Conway engines reverberated throughout your body and sadly, before you knew it, the chute was deployed and the aircraft was slowing down in the distant heat haze. A truly awesome sight; I can only imagine what it must have looked like in the sky.

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It was soon time for the moment that I had been waiting for literally all day, the English Electric Lightning.

The Lightning Preservation Group owns both Lightnings at Bruntingthorpe and they’re both stored in the relatively new QRA shed, just off the old taxiway. Both are in ground running condition but only XR728 was serviceable; I didn’t care to be honest, I’d never seen a Lightning moving under it’s own power before so I was just desperate to see one!

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I’d been pretty brave with shutter speeds for most of the day, lingering somewhere between 1/80 sec and 1/160th sec and so far it’d been great. The shutter speed was dialled in at 1/100th sec; what a mistake to make! I completely underestimated the speed of the Lightning and quickly lost track of it through the viewfinder as it shot past. As a result, I didn’t capture a single sharp shot of it on full reheat but hand on heart, I can honestly say I’m not that bothered – I was completely astounded by the raw power of those engines. The thrust was like nothing I’d ever experienced and it was easily my highlight of the day.

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The freshly painted L-29 Delfin made a brief appearance on the tarmac before the VC-10 brought an end to the day’s proceedings. It was quite strange to see the VC-10 just rolling along the runway, it seems like only yesterday that these graceful aircraft were still in the skies above RAF Brize Norton. Regardless of the relatively short time that’s passed since their retirement, it was really good to see ZD241 taking a stroll again.

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Organised Chaos

That’s what springs to mind anyway when I think about everything other than the aircraft.

The programme of aircraft runnings for the day is changeable and with such complex aircraft I completely understand that. What I didn’t quite understand was the 30-45 minute gaps between one aircraft completing its run and the next one starting (it’s worth noting that there wasn’t an awful lot of explanation over the tanoy either). It would be a much more fluid event if the aircraft could be run up continuously, one after the other and I don’t see why this couldn’t happen if the main taxiway at the top of the airfield was closed off for the afternoon. Maybe someone could shed some light on this?

The lengthy gaps were filled with demonstrations from various large scale models and while these were quite captivating the first time round, they quickly lost my interest when they went up for a second and third time. That’s not to say that I didn’t enjoy them because I did, especially the Hunter and VC-10 (complete with refuelling probes) but they would have been much better off if they were scattered throughout the day a little more.

Unfortunately a couple of the R/C pilots annoyed photographers at the far end of the crowd line when they placed the Vulcan and Victor far too close to the runway, meaning that uncluttered panning shots of aircraft were almost impossible towards the latter part of the day. We tried to get them moved a little but no one seemed interested in helping. With it being a fee-paying event, I thought this aspect could have been handled a little better.

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For all the people that were there (and there were quite a lot), there was a single food outlet selling the usual burgers, hot dogs and chips that we’ve come to expect from events like this. The prices were incredibly reasonable but because it was the sole outlet, the queues were phenomenally long for most of the day (upwards of forty minutes at times). The catering was even more frustrating towards the end of the day when they’d sold out of everything apart from sausages and chips but you didn’t find this out until you’d got to the front of the queue after a half hour wait!

There were also only two sets of toilets and again, these had incredibly long queues for most of the day. The event opened at 9am and by 11am the majority of the men’s toilets had seen better days with a lot of people opting to queue up again but this time for the disabled portaloos.

Quality Vs Practicality

There’s no doubt that Bruntingthorpe’s selection of Cold War-era aircraft are the cream of the crop for any aviation enthusiast but for me, the event was sadly let down by other departments.

A little more organisation and planning on the ‘showground’ front could go an awful long way at an event such as this. This show was relatively miserable in terms of the weather, I dread to think what the facilities would have been like had it been a scorching hot day.

Like I said, on the aircraft front Bruntingthorpe have absolutely nailed it with top quality aviation nostalgia that is second to none but as an event, the day was lacking in a lot of places. The good news is that I think lessons can be learnt from the day and the issues can be resolved pretty easily.

If you’ve not been to one of Bruntingthorpe’s Cold War Jet open days before then you’d be a fool not to go, bite the bullet and make the trip to see these incredible aircraft. Just make sure that you take some ear defenders and be prepared to wait around for a good percentage of the day.

Feature – The Airbus A350 XWB

Aviation, Features

Airbus – a name familiar to the entire world and a company that has been at the forefront of aviation technology for the last 40 years. The manufacturer brought their latest two-aisle airliner to Farnborough International Airshow earlier this Summer and I was lucky enough to be shown around the flying test bed.

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MSN004’s flight test systems

Originally conceived back in 2004, the original A350 was mostly an all-new design but with the main fuselage based on the popular A330. After several meetings and focus groups with potential customers, this idea was rejected and as a result, the A350 XWB (Xtra Wide Wody) was born. As a direct competitor to Boeing’s 787-x series of airliners, Airbus promised that the A350 XWB would have operating costs at least 8% lower than the Dreamliner.

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The A350 XWB is a direct competitor to the Boeing 787-x Dreamliner

Design

Passenger comfort and airline operating costs are clearly at the heart of the design for the A350 XWB.

The A350 XWB is the first aircraft that Airbus have manufactured which is built, in most part, out of a carbon-fibre composite and unlike previous Airbus models, the fuselage width is exactly the same (9 seats in a 3-3-3 layout) along it’s entire length from door one to door four.

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The fuselage is the same width throughout the cabin

With a wingspan of 64.8m and a surface area of approximately 443 metres squared, the A350 XWB boasts the largest wings ever produced for a single deck, two-aisle airliner. The aircraft is also the first to feature the manufacturer’s unique ‘sharklet’ wing tips which it says are the latest advancement in aerodynamic wing design.

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The new wing design and complex composite wide body mean that the aircraft is capable of reducing fuel burn by at least 25% when compared to previous generation competing aircraft. For customer’s looking for a single deck, long-haul aircraft, figures like that are more than enough to sign on the dotted line.

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The cabin design is heavily inspired by the internationally acclaimed A380 with extra large overhead compartments (capable of taking full-size roller bags), full LED lighting systems which are capable of producing 16.7 million different colours and enhanced leg room in all classes. The increased leg room space is achieved by having brand new, fully integrated seat-connect and cabling boxes that are virtually invisible to passengers as they’re run under a full flat floor.

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Testing and Delivery

Amazingly for a modern day airliner; manufacturing, development and testing is all on schedule and the aircraft should be ready for certification by the end of this year.

MSN005 (test aircraft five and the last to be developed) is currently conducting route proving flights to demonstrate the aircraft’s operability, reliability and all round excellent performance that the fuselage and Rolls Royce Trent XWB engine can deliver. The Trent XWB testing began back in 2011 when it was fitted to one of the development A380 test beds and was certified several months later at the end of that year.

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The A350 XWB is fitted with two Rolls Royce Trent XWB engines

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The Rolls Royce Trent XWB engine was tested on a development A380

With 12 months of testing on all five development aircraft due to finish shortly, launch customer Qatar Airways will receive its first aircraft in Q3-Q4 2014.

The Future

Even with the Emirates order for 70 aircraft cancelled, the future of the Airbus A350 XWB is looking bright. To date, 742 aircraft have been ordered across all three varients by some 38 airlines including; Air Asia, Qatar Airways, Cathay Pacific, Etihad, British Airways, United and Singapore Airlines.

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The Xtra Wide Body, twin aisle aircraft will benefit both passengers and airlines alike.

This is Airbus at it’s finest, this is the future.

Review – Farnborough Airshow 2014

2014, Aviation, Reviews

After a hugely successful and record breaking week at the Farnborough International Airshow, airfield owners TAG once again opened up the gates to some 80,000 people for a mid-summer spectacle.

I think almost everyone will agree that the shows at Farnborough have become a shadow of their former self and having had many complaints from the 2012 show, the team at FIA were keen to show that they could improve on their offering.

I attended the Sunday show two years ago; the weather was beautiful but the flying display programme was average at best and the showground was far too crowded. Having held several focus groups, the organising committee had a clear idea of what they needed to do to put Farnborough back on the map.

Fast forward almost two years to the launch day of a re-branded ‘Farnborough Airshow’ and it was an almost unrecognisable event. The entire team held their hands up and admitted in front of the media that they’d fallen behind and delivered a mediocre show in 2012. It was revealed that several star items had been secured for the ‘Celebration of 100 years of aviation’ show; a Spanish Navy AV-8B II Harrier (the result of over 14 months of negotiations with Spanish authorities and a first for Farnborough), the replica Me-262 from Germany, the Breitling sponsored Super Constellation and the Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II.

Through absolutely no fault of their own, just weeks later the Me-262 developed a technical fault which meant that it was to take a sabatical for the rest of the 2014 display season and after a long drawn out PR disaster, Lockheed Martin announced that the F-35 would not be making the transatlantic journey due to a grounding being lifted just days before the show started.

Eyes To The Sky

As mentioned previously, the flying display was one of the main areas that needed development and as well as announcing star items at the launch, it was also explained that a contract had been signed with Airbus to keep several of their ‘trade’ items on the ground for the public show. It later transpired that this signing had been part of a new major sponsorship deal with the aircraft manufacturer for the public two day event.

The Airbus backing meant that the A400M, A380 and E-Fan were all displaying in the flying programme over the weekend and as usual, the test pilots put on an incredible show. Seeing an airliner the size of the A380 being thrown about the sky as if it were a fighter is something that has to be seen to be believed. The A400M (‘Grizzly’ as it’s known to it’s testing team) is due to enter service with the RAF later this year as the ‘Atlas’, so to see it at Farnborough demonstrating it’s tactical capabilities was a real treat. It has to be said that when it comes to large aircraft displays, Airbus are the Kings.

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A contract was also signed with Boeing to supply the airshow with its F/A-18F Super Hornet – the aircraft had flown every day for the trade week and even though I’d already seen it, the technical demonstration of the Super Hornet is simply stunning. Even with the airspace restrictions enforced by Heathrow, the Boeing flown display was easily one of the most entertaining of the weekend. A combination of high-g flicking and turning built up to a finale which consisted of a square loop flown to maximum altitude.

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Without a doubt though, the star of the show was the Spanish Navy AV-8B II Harrier. The RAF disbanded their Harrier squadrons in 2010 and retired the aircraft amidst the political storm that was the SDSR (Strategic Defence and Security Review). Having been absent from the UK circuit for over three years, a Harrier in the Hampshire sky was an almost perfect way to signal Farnborough’s commitment to delivering a better show. The display itself was reminiscent of the ‘role demo’ type displays that the RAF aircraft was forced to fly in it’s final years – three high speed passes and then five full minutes of dirty, smoking hovering. The Harrier is an incredible machine and at a show where it’s successor was a no-show, it was a poetic reminder that the RAF GR.9s were retired way before their time.

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Other highlights from the flying display included the Midair Squadron Canberra PR.9 (filling the gap left by the Me-262) which signed off on that unmistakable howl, a full routine from the Red Arrows who in their 50th year look at the top of their game, a brilliant display of solo aerobatics from Mark Jefferies, a decent routine from Kev Rumens in XH558 and a stunningly beautiful display from the majestic, dolphin-shaped Super Constellation. The ‘Connie’ was on the ground at RIAT last year but this was the first time I’d seen it in the air and even though the display consisted of just two straight and level flypasts, the sight and sound of a 1950s prop-driven airliner was a truly spine-tingling experience.

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It’s fair to say that the past, present and future were fully represented at this year’s 2014 ’100 Years of Aviation’ show.

A Missed Opportunity

During the week, the Farnborough International Airshow takes full advantage of the space available on the ground to showcase commercial and private aircraft, helicopters and in places, light aircraft. The static aircraft that had departed the trade show on the Thursday and Friday left plenty of space that should have been filled but for some reason it wasn’t. Apart from the Catalina, a Royal Navy Merlin and the relocation of the Super Constellation, the static area felt empty. The main reason for this was that the Alenia Aermacchi, TAI and US DoD areas were at the far east of the showground – three of the biggest contingents that remained on the ground for the public days.

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I would have liked to have seen the empty space filled with more aircraft that could have represented the ‘100 Years of Aviation’ theme. There are many warbirds in this country and a handful of classic jets that would have padded out the showground a little more. It would even have been nice to see some aircraft from the RAF and AAC – Farnborough surely could have been a massive recruitment drive for both forces. On an airfield the size of Farnborough, gaps are unfortunately incredibly noticeable.

The Showground

As mentioned previously, 2012 was overcrowded and this meant that queues for both toilets and food had waiting times upwards of 30 minutes. 2014 was a different story (at least on Saturday when I attended) – many more toilets were provided and certainly at the grandstand end of the airfield, they were very clean and well maintained. Food was on the edge of becoming too expensive but at an average price of £5 for a single hot item, it seemed to fit in with the majority of other events up and down the country.

New for 2014 and on the back of similar ideas at both RIAT and Bournemouth Airshow, Farnborough Airshow Live! made it’s debut appearance. Fronted by TV presenters Michael Underwood and Angelica Bell, I have to say that I was a little nervous when I heard about the idea but any worries were soon put to rest. It turns out that both are genuinely interested in aviation and this became clear from some of the conversations that took place between Michael and the commentary team during the show. There was also a large stage just behind the main grandstand that allowed the presenters to question the likes of the Red Arrows in front of the audience. As well as the stage, the air displays were being streamed to large TV screens dotted around the showground thanks to fantastic videography from the guys over at Planes TV – this meant that you could go and get something to eat without being too far from the action.

On the whole I think this concept worked extremely well, even more so with the strong presence of families. It may not have appealed to the hardcore enthusiast but at the end of the day, Farnborough Airshow is targeted as a major attraction to families all over the South of England.

How Much?

With a gate price of £48 per head (under 16s go free), I can’t help but feel that Farnborough is somewhat lost when it comes to ticketing. On the basis of an average family (mum, dad, two teenagers and an infant), the entrance fee alone is more than £140; add travelling costs, food and drink to that and you’re probably looking at somewhere in the region of £200-£250 for a day out at the airshow.

By contrast, a ticket for the Royal International Airshow (an eight hour flying display and extensive static park) costs £44pp and a two day ticket for the RNAS Yeovilton Air Day costs just £39pp (the gate price for the Saturday is just £25). Even with a varied and entertaining flying programme like this year’s, the ticket price is still way off. If the team at FIA are serious about putting Farnborough back on the map, something has to be done about the entrance fee – there is simply no excuse.

One thing that did come down in price however was the souvenir display programme. Created by Key Publishing and priced at just £4, the quality of the programme was exceptional and a massive improvement on the over-glossy, advert filled magazine from 2012.

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The juxtaposition of the ticket price and programme is just mind boggling. I really do find it difficult to understand.

A Promising Step Forwards

To say that Farnborough Airshow is ‘the best airshow in the world’ right now would be a lie. It isn’t. What it is though, is a solid airshow that’s making footsteps in the right direction. The team listened and acted upon certain elements that were heavily criticised in recent years but there are still a handful of things that need addressing, most importantly the shows pricing structure.

With the strong re-branding and procurement of key airborne stars, Farnborough Airshow is definitely making a comeback one step at a time. In years gone by, Farnborough was the home of cutting-edge British technology and a worldwide stage for aviation; don’t be scared of it FIA, embrace it.

Having just celebrated the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the centenary of WWI and the Red Arrows 50th anniversary, aviation is once again making the headlines and one thing is clear – this country is still very much interested in airshows.

It’s time to take full advantage of that and I’m counting down the days until FIA 2016.

Farnborough, it’s over to you…

Farnborough International Airshow 2014 – Wednesday Highlights

Features

The third (and final trade day for me) day has come to an end at Farnborough, here are the biggest talking points of the last 24 hours.

News

  • After a whirlwind day of ‘will they/won’t they’ for both Farnborough and Lockheed Martin, the decision was finally made that although the aircraft has been cleared to return to flight, the F-35B will not be making it’s international debut at Farnborough Airshow this summer.
  • BAE Systems revealed that it’s Taranis combat UAV had conducted a new series of test flights in an ‘undisclosed location’. These new tests were carried out some time between late 2013 and early 2014, and included flying the aircraft in full stealth configuration, making it virtually invisible to radar.
  • Qatar Airways’ boss, Akbar Al Baker has explained that it was in fact Airbus that cancelled plans to display the airline’s A380 and described it as a way for the manufacturer to ‘bully’ the airline into taking delivery of the aircraft. The airline head also said that even though the aircraft wouldn’t have been delivered in time for the airshow, he was hoping that Airbus would display the Qatar liveried A380 on his behalf.
  • AgustaWestland have signed their first UK air ambulance deal for their developmental AW169 helicopter with the Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance Trust. The type is due for certification later this year.
  • Since its launch on Monday, Airbus have already received 105 orders for their A330neo aircraft.
  • Airbus have announced that the A350XWB will use just one engine across the board; the Rolls-Royce Trent 7000.
  • Boeing has selected BAE Systems to provides its latest 777X with a flight control electronics system.
  • Even with Boeing displaying the P-8 Poseidon as a future MPA option for the UK, the RAF have announced that they are looking into the possibility of extending the life of the Sentinel R1 fleet by adding maritime capability with the help of Raytheon. This is not seen as an MPA option as such but more of a hybrid gap-filler.

Displays

Farnborough International Airshow 2014 – Tuesday Highlights

Features

The second day at Farnborough International Airshow promises to be just as successful as the first. Today is a big day for Boeing as the P-8 Poseidon gets airborne in front of an international crowd for the first time in the UK.

News

  • The MoD and Agusta Westland have confirmed that the upgraded Merlin HM2 has entered service four months ahead of schedule.
  • Martin Baker has signed a deal to supply the Turkish Air Force’s Hurkus B turbo-prop trainers with the Mk T16~N ejection seat.
  • Boeing has so far received: 490 787-8 aircraft, 409 787-9 aircraft and 132 787-10 aircraft.
  • Air Asia X are to order 50 Airbus A330neo aircraft.
  • Boeing reveals key elements of their new 777X; the newest twin-aisle long-haul aircraft. Advances include a cabin altitude of 6000 ft, windows 15% larger than the competition, all new interior design, a cabin that is 16 inches wider than the competition, next generation LED lighting and lower cabin noise. Production on over 300 orders begins in 2017 with initial delivery targeted for 2020.
  • UPDATE: The Lockheed Martin F-35A/B/C models have all been cleared to fly but Lockheed Martin and the DoD have made the decision not to send the aircraft to the UK. Big blow for the UK and for Lockheed Martin considering an order is yet to be signed – with the cabinet reshuffle, just how committed is the UK to the Joint Strike Fighter Programme?

Displays

Farnborough International Airshow 2014 – Monday Highlights

Features

Farnborough International Airshow got underway today at the Hampshire airfield and there was certainly plenty to keep an eye on.

News

  • Airbus launches the A330neo which will be the first aircraft to feature the brand new Rolls-Royce Trent 7000 engines. The new Widebody aircraft will be capable of reducing current A330 fuel consumption by 14% per seat and also increase the range by 400 nautical miles. The Neo will also incorporate features from the A350 XWB like the small winglets and engine pylons.
  • Almost immediately after launch came the news that Air Lease Corporation has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for 25 A330neo and 60 A321neo aircraft.
  • Boeing debuted their latest model of the infamous (albeit for the wrong reasons) Dreamliner, the 787-9. The variant is a 10 ft, 10-frame stretch of the existing 8 model. Due to the number of orders received, Boeing had to work as quickly as they could to get this model into production.
  • Qatar Airways continue to support the show with an almost unprecedented three aircraft on display; the sharklet-equipped A320, A350-900 prototype and their Boeing 787-8. There would have been a fourth aircraft present in the shape of their A380 but due to disagreements with their order, the airline reluctantly pulled the display.
  • Announced on July 12th, Saab and the Empire Test Pilots’ School have extended their contract with the Gripen for an additional four years.
  • Also announced in a late afternoon press release from FIA – ‘By 15.00 this afternoon there were firm orders and commitments for 326 large commercial jets and regional aircraft with a combined value of US$33.3bn. In addition there were orders and commitments for a total of 674 jet engines with a combined value of $8.6bn.’
  • The F-35B was notably absent and the grounding order is still in effect at the time of writing.

Displays

Feature – Farnborough Fights Back

Aviation, Features

Once upon a time in a bygone era, Farnborough Airshow was the Airshow to attend. With many brand new and even some prototype aircraft being flown by the world’s greatest test pilots, the Hampshire town was the place to see past, present and future offerings for airlines and air forces around the globe. Decades later, Farnborough Airshow exists in a shadow of its former self – the 2012 show was one to forget for the aviation enthusiast but the team at FIA are keen to put things right for 2014.

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RAF Eurofighter Typhoon at FIA 2012

The 2012 show had many things wrong with it; overcrowding, an average display programme, star items from the trade show leaving before the weekend, the trade halls closing for the weekend, overpriced catering, lack of toilets, and an expensive ticket price for what was on offer. Earlier this year I had the chance to meet with the team behind the scenes and reiterate the concerns that we all had from the show two years previous.

I went along expecting to get into a bit of a spat over what is expected from an Airshow but I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised. The team put their hands up and admitted that they’d let people down and that after holding several focus groups with both enthusiasts and local members of the community, they knew what they needed to do.

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FIA needs star items like the KAI T-50 Golden Eagle from 2012

To give you a little background – the trade show and public show are run as two completely separate events (Farnborough International Airshow and Farnborough Airshow respectively) and therefore trying to get trade aircraft to stay for the public show is a big ask. As was the case in 2012, many star items did in fact leave before the public show and for 2014 the team have tried to correct this. Investing quite heavily in manufacturers and foreign governments, the 5 1/2 hour public show has managed to secure star items like the F-35B, Airbus A380, Breitling Super Constellation and a Spanish Naval Harrier (the result of more than 14 months of negotiations with Spanish authorities).

F-35B © Lockheed Martin Corporation

The theme for the 2014 public show is ‘100 Years of Aviation’ and while some Airshows have had quite weak themes in the past, Farnborough Airshow are really focused on honouring this centenary and will be showcasing the past, present and future of aviation. As well as those aircraft already mentioned, there will also be a replica Me262 in the flying display this year – this is a fantastic achievement for Farnborough and it will be the first time that this aircraft has ever flown in the UK. The show will also commemorate 100 years since the start of the First World War with a brilliant display from the Great War Display Team.

It would appear that Sarah Harding, Head of Flight Operations at Farnborough has recognised that the show needs to evolve and offer the public a little something extra. For 2014, this will come in the form of some very special double acts. The F-35B will appear in the air with the Spanish Navy Harrier, demonstrating the capabilities of V/STOL aircraft while the Me262 will display with the Classic Air Force Meteor – both of these displays can only be seen this year at Farnborough. It’s not just in the air that things are improving either – for the first time ever, the static exhibit space is full for both the trade and public shows; and there are many operators still on a waiting list for a space should one become available.

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Sarah Harding, Head of Flight Operations with Shaun Ormrod, Chief Executive FIA

As well as the public show, the trade show is also set to be a massive hit this year with early figures indicating –

  • 20 bespoke buildings for individual exhibitors
  • 98% of self-build hall space sold
  • 18 international pavilions, 2 new: Norway and Malaysia
  • 56% international exhibitors; 44% UK exhibitors
  • 3 new countries participating – Tunisia, Malaysia and Thailand
  • 26% of exhibitors are new to FIA
  • 15% of exhibitors have increased space on 2012
  • Part of the new Chalet Row A development has been sold to Martin Baker for the next five shows
  • New delegations and UK MoD lounge
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The brand new Chalet Row A development

While there is a big tick against the flying and static displays, there is a lot outstanding to make 2014 a vast improvement on the last couple of shows. In February, the team were eager to tell us that the there will be many more changes – more toilets, a greater range of catering facilities and a revised crowd line layout.

Unfortunately though, the trade halls will remain closed. The closure came in 2012 due to two reasons; Health and Safety were concerned that the larger models could pose a risk to smaller children and also, participating companies could not afford to keep their stalls manned for the weekend where they weren’t making any sales. The days of going home with bags full of freebies are sadly over.

So it’s time to put 2012 to rest and look ahead to what’s in store for 2014. I seriously hope that everything comes together for the team this year and that both the trade show and public show turn out to be a massive success. Farnborough Airshow will never be able to reproduce the glory days but it can certainly do it’s best to return as a favourite amongst the enthusiast crowd.

FIA, I’ve got everything crossed for you!

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Farnborough International Airshow runs from 14th-18th July with the public show running from 19th-20th July. To find out more, head over to http://www.farnborough.com, follow @FIAFarnborough on Twitter and like Farnborough Airshow on Facebook.